PMNHS Annual Conference

23-24th March 2019, Cardiff

 

Marine Life in a Changing World

Please register now for the PMNHS Annual Conference, which will be held in the spacious and modern St Fagan’s Museum of History just a few miles from the centre of Cardiff. Topics presented will include work on intertidal ecology, shark genetics, ray distribution, cephalopods, herring, scallops, Seasearch, MCS Wales, sediment contamination, seagrasses, MPAs and, of course, Brexit, as well as results from the Society’s own 2018 field trips and details of upcoming ones in 2019. A full programme will be available on the website soon. Registration is now open via Eventbrite on the PMNHS website meetings page.

Please note that the programme will include another of our popular Observations Sessions during the Sunday afternoon. Please bring along your observations for discussion, e.g. interesting behaviour, rare sightings, unusual prey, strange objects. With a room full of experienced and curious marine biologists this is a good forum to get answers or show something interesting. Contact Jon Moore on jon@ticara.co.uk to send digital materials in advance.

We are also holding two exciting pre-conference events on Friday 22nd March in the National Museum of Wales, Cathays Park, which is in the centre of Cardiff: (1) an hour-long tour of the museum’s extensive marine invertebrate and molluscs collections from 3.30-4.30pm and (2) an all day mollusc and polychaete workshop. Full details and who to contact to book are available here. Scroll down the page to find the information.

There will as usual be a convivial conference dinner (and quiz) on the Saturday evening and a raffle during the Sunday. We look forward to meeting everyone, members and non-members alike.

Please visit www.pmnhs.co.uk for more information on the Society and the Conference, but if you have any further questions please email me on frances.dipper@sustenergy.co.uk and I will direct you to the appropriate person.

Frances Dipper
Hon. Secretary PMNHS

Too windy for Porcupines? Never!

 

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